Monthly Archives: June 2019

Nutritional interventions for preventing stunting in children living in urban slums

Loughborough University in collaboration with Cochrane, AFIDEP, and AXA Research fund have released a Cochrane systematic review of the international journal Maternal and Child Nutrition titled, “Nutritional interventions for preventing stunting in children (0 to 5 years) living in urban slums in low and middle-income countries (LMIC).” Cochrane Reviews are systematic reviews of primary research in

Making research matter for development: AFIDEP and PRB train researchers in effective communication of their research

Between June 6-13, 2019, the African Institute for Development Policy (AFIDEP) and the Population Reference Bureau (PRB) trained early career researchers from Africa, Asia and the Caribbean in effective communication of their research. The purpose is to develop the capacity of these researchers in translating their research for policymakers and other non-scientific stakeholders in order to ensure research is used to improve development effectiveness.

Communicating for action: AFIDEP and PRB host policy communication workshop

The African Institute for Development Policy (AFIDEP) and the Population Reference Bureau (PRB) through the Policy Communication Fellows Program are hosting the 2019-2020 Summer Institute, a workshop seeking to bridge the gap that exists between the research community and policy audiences through effective communication. The workshop began on 6th June 2019 and will run for a week to 12th June 2019 at Sunbird Lilongwe Hotel in Lilongwe, Malawi.

Evidence and a multisectoral approach should guide action to end teenage pregnancies and address sexual reproductive health

Experts convened at a policy dialogue by The African Institute for Policy Development (AFIDEP) and United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) has emphasized the need to have evidence guided policy action to deal with the problem conclusively.
In Kenya, almost 2 out of every 10 girls between the ages of 15 and 19 are reported to be pregnant or have had a child already. This trend has been fairly consistent for more than two decades, with Demographic and Health Surveys showing little change on prevalence between 1993 and 2014.