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AFIDEP at a Glance

AFIDEP works towards systemic actions that drive a cultural shift from low evidence use to a setting where evidence is actively sought and used routinely in decision-making so that the right investments are made towards the transformation of people’s lives for the better.

6 July 2021 / Research Reports

This study conducted cost-benefit analyses on several interventions. The combination of the two interventions would have the largest absolute impact on malaria burden in the country. We do not overemphasize differences in the point estimates of the respective BCRs, since each comes with substantial uncertainty.

Our Focus Areas

We focus on clarifying the implications of population change –including population growth, age structure changes, migration and urbanisation– on Africa’s development prospects.
This is an area of our work that aims to promote and nurture strong health systems in African countries in order to make significant progress on persistent health challenges as well as emerging epidemics such as non-communicable diseases, antimicrobial resistance, neglected tropical diseases and many others.
Our work on this theme focuses on synthesising and translating evidence and promoting its use in order to enhance the prioritisation of education and skill development and guide operationalisation of education reforms to turn Africa’s youthful population into a driving force for socioeconomic transformation and development.
Our work on this theme focuses on support African governments to apply systems thinking and planning in their efforts to address the challenges posed by the combined effect of rapid population growth and climate change on the continent.
Our work on this theme focuses on strengthening capacity for evidence-informed decision-making as a mechanism for enhancing better governance and accountability in service delivery and use of public resources. We also look at the intersection of governance with gender equality.
Gender equity is a cross-cutting theme across all of our programmes. We place great emphasis on understanding how to accelerate gender equality, how to address barriers to female participation in all spheres of life, and how to improve health and economic outcomes for girls, boys, men and women.

Our Objectives

In order for Africa to achieve sustained, equitable development, the decision-making practices— especially in the public sector —should be underpinned by evidence. This requires a culture of consistent evidence use, especially in the public sector.
While supporting African governments in policy formulation, we have identified gaps in the use of evidence for priority-setting, programme implementation and performance management. Policymakers’ requests for evidence to help them move from policy formulation to prioritisation of interventions further confirms the existence of these gaps.

AFIDEP @Afidep
29 July 2021

Register Now! First webinar takes place next week, 5 Aug (4-5.30pm, EAT). 𝐓𝐨𝐩𝐢𝐜: Experiences of individual researc… https://t.co/wzHlz9HHoI

Recent Publications

6 July 2021 / Policy Briefs

Although malaria is a largely preventable and treatable disease, it is a significant cause of mortality, morbidity, and productivity loss in Malawi. This study estimates that in 2019, malaria generated health and productivity losses equivalent to MWK 94,770 million – or 1.7 per cent of GDP. Increasing insecticide resistance and less than optimal (60%) care-seeking behaviour represent two of the most pressing issues facing the country when it comes to reducing the burden of malaria. The main policy recommendation from this cost-benefit analysis is that the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP) should fully adopt piperonyl butoxide (PBO) insecticide-treated bednets (ITNs) and rollout community-informed mass media to increase the rate at which people seek formal care when they, or their children, have fever. PBO ITNs have been shown to have a greater effectiveness against mosquitos compared to the ITNs that Malawi has used in the past.

6 July 2021 / Research Reports

This study conducted cost-benefit analyses on several interventions. The combination of the two interventions would have the largest absolute impact on malaria burden in the country. We do not overemphasize differences in the point estimates of the respective BCRs, since each comes with substantial uncertainty.

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