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AFIDEP at a Glance

AFIDEP works towards systemic actions that drive a cultural shift from low evidence use to a setting where evidence is actively sought and used routinely in decision-making so that the right investments are made towards the transformation of people’s lives for the better.

26 April 2021 / Research Reports

Vector-borne diseases are illnesses transmitted by mosquitoes, ticks, tsetse flies, lice, snails etc. Africa is disproportionately affected by vector-borne diseases, with most deaths occurring among children under five. The main vector-borne disease in the continent includes malaria, yellow fever, dengue and HAT.  The Partnership for Increasing the Impact of Vector Control (PIIVeC) programme seeks to reduce the burden of vector-borne diseases through effective, locally appropriate, and sustainable vector control.

This stakeholder analysis was based on a rapid desk review of policies, strategies, programmes and other relevant information from the various stakeholders. Based on these reviews, we scored stakeholders’ interests and influence in vector-control and vector-borne disease policies and programmes in the continent. 

Our Focus Areas

We focus on clarifying the implications of population change –including population growth, age structure changes, migration and urbanisation– on Africa’s development prospects.
This is an area of our work that aims to promote and nurture strong health systems in African countries in order to make significant progress on persistent health challenges as well as emerging epidemics such as non-communicable diseases, antimicrobial resistance, neglected tropical diseases and many others.
Our work on this theme focuses on synthesising and translating evidence and promoting its use in order to enhance the prioritisation of education and skill development and guide operationalisation of education reforms to turn Africa’s youthful population into a driving force for socioeconomic transformation and development.
Our work on this theme focuses on support African governments to apply systems thinking and planning in their efforts to address the challenges posed by the combined effect of rapid population growth and climate change on the continent.
Our work on this theme focuses on strengthening capacity for evidence-informed decision-making as a mechanism for enhancing better governance and accountability in service delivery and use of public resources. We also look at the intersection of governance with gender equality.
Gender equity is a cross-cutting theme across all of our programmes. We place great emphasis on understanding how to accelerate gender equality, how to address barriers to female participation in all spheres of life, and how to improve health and economic outcomes for girls, boys, men and women.

Our Objectives

In order for Africa to achieve sustained, equitable development, the decision-making practices— especially in the public sector —should be underpinned by evidence. This requires a culture of consistent evidence use, especially in the public sector.
While supporting African governments in policy formulation, we have identified gaps in the use of evidence for priority-setting, programme implementation and performance management. Policymakers’ requests for evidence to help them move from policy formulation to prioritisation of interventions further confirms the existence of these gaps.

AFIDEP @Afidep
06 May 2021

📢 New job vacancy alert📢 We seek an experienced Project Manager for a new governance project that will produce, an… https://t.co/siNKjxGV4B

Recent Publications

26 April 2021 / Research Reports

Vector-borne diseases are illnesses transmitted by mosquitoes, ticks, tsetse flies, lice, snails etc. Africa is disproportionately affected by vector-borne diseases, with most deaths occurring among children under five. The main vector-borne disease in the continent includes malaria, yellow fever, dengue and HAT.  The Partnership for Increasing the Impact of Vector Control (PIIVeC) programme seeks to reduce the burden of vector-borne diseases through effective, locally appropriate, and sustainable vector control.

This stakeholder analysis was based on a rapid desk review of policies, strategies, programmes and other relevant information from the various stakeholders. Based on these reviews, we scored stakeholders’ interests and influence in vector-control and vector-borne disease policies and programmes in the continent. 

Although the majority of Malawi’s economy depends on agriculture, there are limited crops that are currently suitable for export to neighbouring countries due to quality control issues, poor transportation linkages, uncoordinated farmers with relatively low productivity levels and access to markets, and policy disincentives. 

This analysis has focused on two of the primary barriers preventing the export of regionally demanded crops: The long-standing export ban on maize; and Poor quality control standards and regulations for groundnuts. 

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