X
13 December 2018

This briefing note summarises a review of literature and policies on youth demographics and implications from our scenario modelling of the short, medium and long-term projections of the youth population in Tanzania, and their demand for essential services.

13 November 2018

This briefing note summarises a review of literature and policies on youth demographics and implications from our scenario modelling of the short, medium and long-term projections of the youth population in Rwanda, and their demand for essential services.

17 October 2018

The primary objective of this study was to assess Namibia’s prospects for harnessing the demographic dividend and to identify priority options for maximising the dividend. Demographic change has implications for the realisation of these ambitions. This report, therefore, outlines the key policy recommendations on how Namibia can harness the potential of her youthful population to achieve socio-economic development. The Demographic Dividend paradigm offers a framework that is congruent with the needs of Namibia’s long-term development aspirations as well as the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

13 July 2018

This briefing note summarises a review of literature and policies on youth demographics and implications from our scenario modelling of the short-term and medium-term projections of the youth population in Uganda. Specifically, the briefing note highlights the demand for basic services against population projections.

20 June 2018

The East African Community (EAC), is a regional intergovernmental partnership between six countries (Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, South Sudan, Uganda, and the United Republic of Tanzania), originally conceived in 1967 by three founder states (Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania), and formally established in 2000 by a treaty. The pillars of integration, which are at various stages of implementation, include a customs union, a common market, a monetary union, and ultimately a political federation. The four EAC countries (Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda), which are the focus of this briefing note, have a combined population of more than 150 million, with Rwanda being […]

19 June 2018

This research briefing note summarises a review of literature and policies on regional youth demographics and highlights implications from scenario modelling of the short-term, medium and long-term projections of the youth population in Kenya. Specifically, the briefing note highlights the demand for basic and social services against population projections.

31 May 2018

Despite this high-level expression of commitment, policymakers still need to do more to integrate demographic dividend research into their country’s policymaking processes. Drawing on the experiences of expert engagements with policymakers in Uganda, Malawi, and Kenya this paper outlines how experts have effectively communicated demographic dividend research to government officials, who in turn, incorporated these results into policies. While these interactions are still a work in progress, they provide lessons on how experts can more effectively communicate research with policymakers. (This research paper is also available for download on the Wilson Center Africa Program page).

9 December 2017

The Network of African Parliamentary Committees of Health (NEAPACOH, previously known as the Southern and Eastern Africa Parliamentary Alliance of Committees on Health (SEAPACOH)) is one of the active networks engaging members of parliament (MPs) in Africa to strengthen the delivery of their functions of oversight, legislation and representation, in tackling health challenges in the region. This study sought to understand NEAPACOH’s contributions in strengthening parliamentary committees in Africa to tackle health and population challenges, and identify ways in which the network can become more effective in the delivery of its mandate. Given the integral role of information or evidence […]

17 July 2014

Tanzania’s demographic and economic profiles favourably position it to benefit from the demographic dividend if the country unleashes its full development potential by simultaneously prioritising: reforms and investments that accelerate fertility decline; industrialisation and job creation; investments in education and health to develop quality human capital; and improved governance and accountability in use of the country’s financial and natural resources.

24 March 2013

Family Planning (FP) has immense health, environmental, and economic growth benefits. For instance, it is estimated that in 2008, family planning averted 32% of maternal deaths in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), and that such deaths would decline by a further 29% if all women who want to avoid pregnancy use an effective contraceptive method (Ahmed et al. 2012). Family planning also helps save the lives of children; spacing births of children by at least two years would reduce deaths of infants by 10% and deaths of children aged 1-5 years by about 20% (Cleland et al. 2012).